BIG LIST OF WEBSITES

List of Top Websites on Bigotry

Top 250 Websites on BIGOTRY

Download the Top 250 Websites to PDF

Last updated on Jan 1 2020.
Here are the best websites we found: bigotry.com • yjbigotry.blogspot.com • yjbigotry.blogspot.tw • bigotry.stream • travelingepic.com • liberationnews.org • psychopathresistance.wordpress.com • nomorelost.org • holyirony.wordpress.com

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Bigotry.com domain name is for sale. Inquire now.. Bigotry.com is available for purchase. Get in touch to discuss the possibilities!
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Bigotry. YOUR DESCRIPTION HERE
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Bigotry. YOUR DESCRIPTION HERE
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Traveling Epic! – Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry -Twain. Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry -Twain
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Liberation News: reporting from the front-line of struggle. LIberation is the newspaper of the Party for Socialism and Liberation, with militant journalism and revolutionary analysis from the front-lines of struggle.
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Psychopath Resistance | Learn how to recognize them. Then you can resist them.. Learn how to recognize them. Then you can resist them.
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No More Lost - Advocating for an end to LGBT deaths due to bigotry, and remembering those we have lostNo More Lost | Advocating for an end to LGBT deaths due to bigotry, and remembering those we have lost. Advocating for an end to LGBT deaths due to bigotry, and remembering those we have lost
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Holy Irony | FINGERING RELIGIOUS BIGOTRY, HYPOCRISY AND ASSHOLERY. FINGERING RELIGIOUS BIGOTRY, HYPOCRISY AND ASSHOLERY
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Freedom from the Forbidden | All things gender and Islam. No bigotry is allowed in this feminist territory.. All things gender and Islam. No bigotry is allowed in this feminist territory.
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normatalksabout. . . | Writing about love, death and bigotry. Writing about love, death and bigotry
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The Polemicist | Blunt Bigotry, Fight Fascism. Blunt Bigotry, Fight Fascism
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Traveling Epic! – Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry -Twain. Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry -Twain
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Anti-Racist – Violence for peace. Against fascism, racism and bigotry.. Violence for peace. Against fascism, racism and bigotry.
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Kemetics against bigotry. This blog is dedicated to creating a list of members within the Kemetic community that support hate and bigotry. This involves but is not limited to: racism, transphobia, isamiphobia, truscum,...
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[email protected] Terrorism, Imperialism, Extremism and Bigotry | Just another WordPress.com weblog. Just another WordPress.com weblog
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Exploring Economics, Class, Crime, Civil Rights, Poverty, Race, Bias and Bigotry
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Positive Atheism (since 1995) Join the Struggle Against Anti-Atheist Bigotry!
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Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.
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CAIR-Cleveland – Protecting Civil Rights. Fighting Bigotry. Promoting Tolerance.
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CAIR-Columbus – Protecting Civil Rights. Fighting Bigotry. Promoting Tolerance.
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Redress Information & Analysis – Exposing injustice, disinformation and bigotry
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WheatyPete's World | Stories of teaching and travelling. Mark Twain -Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness. Henry Miller – One's destination is never a place, but always a new way of seeing things.. This is just a short excerpt for the about page.
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. Bigotry and hatred, and bigotry and hatred accessories
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Atlas of Prejudice. A book with funny maps and essays about bigotry, paranoia, politics and prejudice by Yanko Tsvetkov, a leading international bigotry professional with a taste for unconventional historical studies.
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SnowWolf1118. American Palestinian. Female. Muslm. Age 23. Likes: My cats, friends, and family. Supporter of LGBTQA+, immigrants, and the working class. Dislikes: Injustice, bigotry, etc.
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Project Reason: A Non-Profit Dedicated to Reason. Project Reason is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit foundation devoted to spreading scientific knowledge and secular values in society. The foundation draws on the talents of prominent and creative thinkers in a wide range of disciplines to encourage critical thinking and erode the influence of dogmatism, superstition, and bigotry in our world.
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Conservatives Are Destroying Our Future. This blog is for Americans who are tired of right wing bigotry and hate that's filled the air waves lately. Civil debate welcomed.
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Americans Against Hate. Americans Against Hate (AAH) is a civil rights organization and terrorism watchdog group, whose goal is to be an active voice against those that spread bigotry and violence.
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Ronald Thomas West | Intelligence agency snafus, corruption exposés, satire & general irreverence. In any democracy, ethics, self restraint, tolerance and honesty will always take a second seat to narcissism, avarice, bigotry & persecution, if only because people who play by the rules in any democracy are at a disadvantage to those who easily subvert the rules to their own advantage (Ronald’s Maxim) A + B = C…
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Josie Holford: Rattlebag and Rhubarb | . We awaited demobilisation All that winter of 1918 While we toiled in the grime of Taranto Loading ammo and cleaning latrines When they treated the whites to a pay rise It was like someone lobbed a grenade All our years of resentment exploded Saying, to hell with their rules and parades From No Parades by Chris Hoban. Listen here: Chris Hoban's song pretty much sums up the experience of the British West Indies Regiment (BWIR) in WW1. (And do give it a listen - it's haunting in its story-telling and evocation of the music of the period.) It's a story of how racism bigotry and mistreatment betrayed the loyalty, patriotism and courage of 15,000 men all of whom volunteered to fight for the Empire. It's also a story of mutiny, colonialism and the kickstart of the movement for self-determination and independence. What first spiked my interest in the BWIR was reading through the names in the record book of the Taranto Town Cemetery Extension. The Town Cemetery was used for British and Empire burials from June 1915 to April 1919, but by January 1918, it was necessary to open a military extension. After the Armistice the 102 Commonwealth burials in the town cemetery were removed to this extension. There are now 449 WW1 Commonwealth burials in the extension. There among the names of the dead are 147 from the British West Indies Regiment. Why were they there and what had happened to them? I started to get interested in the history of the regiment and that of course led to the Taranto mutiny of the winter of 1918-1919. Here's the story. Background to the Mutiny Taranto is an industrial town on the Mediterranean. Italy entered the war on the Allied side in May 1915 and the Royal Navy began using Taranto as a Mediterranean base soon thereafter. Taranto became a key transit point on the supply lines to and from Egypt. Mesopotamia, Palestine and Salonika. Lines of communication were established between the eastern theaters of war that ran then through Taranto, Turin, Lyons and Le Mans to Cherbourg It's where ships came in to re-coal and where troops passed through on their way from the near east to the Western Front or back to Britain. A huge tented encampment was set up to accommodate them and No 79 General and No 6 Labour Hospitals followed with more permanent brick and concrete structures added over time. It was a base and rest camp and labour units, including the 8th, 10th and 11th Battalions, British West Indies Regiment, were brought in to service the camp as well as load and unload the ships and trains. In 1915 the British War Office - which had initially opposed recruitment of West Indian troops - created the British West Indies Regiment (BWIR). It served in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. In spite of promises made at the time of recruitment, BWIR did not give black soldiers from the West Indies the opportunity to fight as equals alongside white soldiers. Instead, the War Office largely limited this trained infantry regiment to labour duties. Over 15,600 West Indian men volunteered for the BWIR, two-thirds of whom were from Jamaica. Others came from Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, the Bahamas, British Honduras, Grenada, British Guiana (now Guyana), the Leeward Islands, St Lucia and St Vincent. 185 were killed and 1,071 died of illness as a result of the war. The first battalions of the BWIR were stationed on the Suez Canal and were first used as labour battalions. They saw front line service in Palestine and Jordan serving with distinction as part of General Allenby's force that drove out the Turks and contributed to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire. They earned medals and commendations for bravery and were mentioned in despatches. Later BWIR battalions were sent to the Western Front and then to Italy where they served in auxiliary roles that included digging trenches, construction of roads and gun emplacements, acting as stretcher bearers, loading ships and trains, and working in ammunition dumps. This was dangerous work often carried out in France and Flanders within range of German artillery and sniper fire. After the Armistice in November 1918, eight battalions of the BWIR – 8000 or so men - were stationed at Taranto in preparation for demobilization. They were joined by the battalions returning from Egypt and Mesopotamia many of whom had served in combat. Long standing grievances and growing resentment over unfair treatment, pay and promotion issues had been brewing for some time and in early December they erupted. This was a time of uprisings, riots and disturbances across the British Army. Men who had signed on for duration wanted to go home and get on with their lives. Mutiny and revolution were in the air. The BWIR had some very specific long-standing grievances and a growing resentment over unfair treatment, pay and promotion issues and in December 1918 they reached boiling point. The underlying issue was of course the betrayal of the promise made to them at recruitment: that they would be treated on an equal footing with the other regiments of the British army. Instead they had been primarily used for manual labor and treated as 'native" labor battalions and not as front line troops. Although designated as an infantry regiment and entitled to the same terms of service as other British regiments, commanders and officials often subjected the BWIR to the menial conditions dictated for 'native' corps. Military commanders and officials regarded the BWIR as inferior and treated them accordingly. On the Western Front they were excluded from facilities enjoyed by other British soldiers. The medical care and recreational facilities offered to West Indian troops was often inferior as a result. Estaminets – simple civilian-run cafes that offered the ubiquitous egg-and-chips respite from army food - were off-limits for Chinese and African Labour battalions and that restriction was extended to the BWIR, even though they were officially a unit of the British army. When they were wounded or became sick they were treated in 'native' hospitals and received poor treatment. Commissioned officer rank was restricted to those of 'pure" European descent and pay increases, granted to the British army in 1917, were withheld until protests from West Indian soldiers. Equally problematic was the official reluctance to deploy West Indians as combat troops. It meant that they had fewer opportunities to show the battlefield courage so prized by the military; fewer opportunities for medals and decorations. Their contribution - carrying ammunition, loading trains, building roads, railways and gun emplacements, cleaning latrines, cooking, carrying the wounded, digging trenches and graves, clearing the deadly debris of battle - had none of the supposed warrior glamour and glory of the battlefield. Ironically, it was the labour battalions that built the graveyards and cemeteries that are the symbols of remembrance. The Black Soldier's Lament – written by Canadian veteran George A. Borden in the 1980s - reflects the bitter disappointment of the injustice, the sense of shame and loss of manhood. At Taranto, soldiers reported being ostracized: "since we came here, we couldn't understand why these British soldiers they didn't seem to want any attachment with us. We had always seemed to get on good together in Egypt," a soldier from British Guiana recalled. They were given labour duties, loading and unloading ships and trains, as well as being ordered to clean latrines for white units. Meanwhile, sick and wounded BWIR men continued to succumb to illness and disease. In August 1918,12 men from Barbados had signed a respectful petition (you can read it here) outlining their grievances about pay pointing out that soldiers from white regiments had received a pay increase while they – together with "native" regiments - had not. They specifically identified this as a betrayal of the promises made to them at the time of recruitment. In addition, black soldiers had not been permitted to rise through the ranks, despite good recommendations. The Hon. J C Lynch, Chair of the Recruiting Committee, sent a letter in support of the petition indicating the justice of the claims. He also described the respectable (middle class) and often professional or land-owning backgrounds from which these men came. The 12 signatories were Joseph Chamberlain Hope DCM, Vernon G Thomas, Edward E. Packer, Vincent Lionel Talma, Leslie A. Greaves, John Berkeley Johnson, L'Estrand C. Deane, Alexander L. Marshall, Lashington L. Skinner, T Thompson, Herman P.J. Ince, and G.F. Bowen. Nothing came of this petition. After Armistice Day, on November 11 1918, the eight BWIR battalions in Europe were concentrated at Taranto in Italy to prepare for demobilization. They were subsequently joined by the battalions from Egypt and Mesopotamia. The combat veterans arriving in Taranto from the east were subjected to the same discrimination and second class status and treatment as the labour battalions. Brigadier-General Cyril Darcy Vivien Cary-Barnard was base commandant known for his strict segregationist regulations. According to some accounts, the men had been refused leave to enter town and he forbade black soldiers from using facilities alongside white soldiers. They had separate canteens they were not allowed to go to the cinema when white troops were there. When sick they were sent to the 'native' hospital where they received inferior treatment. They were prevented from being able to rise through the ranks. They were employed on fatigues and laboring duties in spite of assurances that this would not happen. All of these men had volunteered to serve and all of this was counter to the promises of equal treatment and opportunity they had been given on recruitment. Discontent was rife at Taranto just as it was across a broad spectrum of the British Army in the weeks after the Armistice. Canadian troops stationed in Britain, for example, staged three major riots. The BWIR had quite specific and particular grievances however, and they arose from the unequal and demeaning treatment they received. Soldiers returning from the Middle East had enlisted first and were ready to be mobilized. They resented being used as porters for white soldiers in transit and they resented being subject to the rigid segregation policies that barred them from equal access to canteens and cinemas. The designation "native" was imposed denying the BWIR access to proper medical facilities Major Thursfield of the 5th battalion protested to the camp commandant Brigadier-General Cyril Darcy Vivien Cary-Barnard about the betrayal of the promises made to the men. Cary-Barnard was a decorated veteran of the Boer War where he served with Lumsden's Horse. He served with distinction on the Western Front. He was decorated for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, wounded, mentioned in despatches and promoted. And from October 1917, to 31 January 1919 he was Base Commandant, Taranto. At camp commander, Cary-Barnard had a reputation for harsh discipline and a dismissive attitude toward the legitimate grievances of the men of the BWIR. Field punishment was meted out for even trivial offenses removing the discretion from junior officers whose attitudes he regarded as too lenient. Cary-Barnard's response to Thursfield's protest was abrupt, brutal, racist and dismissive. The men were only niggers… no such treatment should ever have been promised them …they were better fed and treated than any nigger had a right to expect… he would order them to do whatever work he pleased, and if they objected he would force them to do it. On 6 December 1918, sergeants from the BWIR forwarded a petition with 180 names to the Secretary of State repeating the demands of the earlier petition, including for the pay increase granted by Army Order No.1 1918 to all Imperial troops. They also expressed their resentment at being barred from the possibility of rising through the ranks and outlined some of the history of West Indian service in the British forces where this color bar was not observed. They also requested an increase in the separation pay – money that was sent home to help their families. Inflation and war profiteering had led to huge increases in the prices of basic commodities and their families were suffering hardship in their absence. Captain Reginald Elgar Willis of the 9th battalion had travelled with the fifth contingent from Kingston on March 30th 1917. Promoted to Lt.Col., Willis had a reputation as a harsh disciplinarian. On December 6th 1918, ordered his men to clean the latrines used by Italian laborers. They refused and some men surrounded his tent and slashed at it with knives and bayonets before dispersing. There was some shooting and wild talk. Some men made demands that demobilization process be speeded up so that they would be home by Christmas. The next day the 9th and 10th battalions refused to work and there were clashes. They were forcibly disarmed and ordered on a route march. On December 8th, Pte. Samuel Pinnock was killed by Acting Sgt, Robert Richards who was charged with negligently discharging his rifle and was sentenced to four months labor. This was the only fatality during the mutiny period. Unrest and insubordination continued for four days with men refusing refusing orders and refusing to work. Unnerved, the military authorities reacted harshly and swiftly. The camp commander requested support and a battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment and a machine gun company were order to Taranto traveling "in fighting order with ammunition in their pouches". The mutineers were arrested. The 9th battalion was disbanded and the men distributed among the other battalions. The whole regiment was disarmed. Sixty men were charged with mutiny and 47 were found guilty. Most received sentences of between 3-5 years. One man - Pte. Arthur Sanches - who was considered the ringleader - was sentenced to death. This sentence was commuted to 20 years penal servitude. (He did not serve full term as in 1934 he was a member of the delegation that presented a petition to the Governor of Jamaica – Sir Arthur Jelf - requesting improvements to the roads and water service supply on the lands granted to ex servicemen.) Many accounts state that one man was executed for his part in the mutiny. This does not seem to be correct. One man was shot at dawn on January 20th 1919. He was Pte. Albert Denny of the 8th battalion who was executed by firing squad for the murder of Pte. Edgar Hilkiah Best 13573 10th Battalion of Barbados in a robbery on the 5th of September. The British authorities did make concessions and mobilization plans were speeded up. The Colonial Office prevailed on the War Office and in February 1919 the BWIR got, in full, the increased separation allowances withheld from them in the Army Order No.1. Even after the courts-martial the spirit of resistance continued. Some of those who who had been convicted and repatriated to the West Indies staged further revolts; disturbances occurred on the SS Orca which docked at Kingston, Jamaica. There, BWIR men allied themselves with seamen repatriated from Britain to protest their treatment. There was also discontent at Plymouth where in February 1919 four men of the BWIR were found guilty and received 2 years detention. In the midst of an even harsher camp regime enforced after the revolt, on December 17th 50-60 sergeants of the BWIR met and formed the Caribbean League. They held four meetings in December and early January and discussed not only their grievances but also their plans for what to do when they returned home. Out of their discussions emerged a sense of a pan-Caribbean identity and political awakening. They called for greater cooperation between the islands and mainland Caribbean territories and they talked of seeking independence and self-determination. At the second meeting one man - Sgt. Baxter - said that the black man "should have freedom and govern himself in the West Indies" and that "force must be used and if necessary blood shed to obtain the object". Such words would have alarmed the colonial establishment and probably drowned out the more modest aim of the League, "the Promotion of all matters conducive to the General Welfare of the islands constituting the British West Indies and the British Territories adjacent thereto." They agreed to strike for higher wages on their return home. They talked of a Caribbean–wide governing body with a headquarters in Kingston, although the choice of Jamaica led to some inter-island rivalry and controversy about the location.This was a distinctly social democratic and reformist agenda but also problematic for those determined to maintain the status quo of economic and power arrangements. At first the Caribbean League was treated with cautious approval by the military authorities as they saw it as a way to help contain and manage the discontent of the troops. At one of the later meetings however, one of the participants - Sgt. Leon Poucher, a Trinidadian reported to his commanding officer that they talk had turned toward self-government and strike action. This concern was relayed to the colonial authorities in the West Indies who were spooked by the thought of thousands of radicalized and angry ex-servicemen returning to their homes determined to seek change. The Caribbean League did not survive demobilization which was completed by August 1919. Although it was short-lived it seems to have had a powerful and radicalizing impact on those who participated. It gave rise to a new and confident voice of resistance that was to make an impact on the politics and social conditions of the post-war Caribbean. Take a look at this poem written at the time:Before enlisting Monteith had been a school teacher in Jamaica. He had written a number of patriotic poems praising the war effort and the Empire that had been published in the Jamaican Times. These words reflect a personal transformation and a new political outlook that many of the men of the BWIR would take home with them. In some ways this new spirit was presaged by the thinking at enlistment. By joining the imperial war effort to fight for king and country many hoped to prove something. Look at this 1915 article in the Jamaican journal the Grenada Federalist: As coloured people we will be fighting for something more, something inestimable to ourselves. We will be fighting to prove to Great Britain that we are not so vastly inferior to the white. We will be fighting to prove that we are no longer merely subjects but citizens – citizens of a world empire whose watch word should be Liberty, Equality and Brotherhood. The was an opportunity to show proof of worth, of the right of equality and freedom. Deliberately keeping these men from the combat duties of the front line served to thwart those aspirations. It had instead another outcome - that of radicalizing a generation of activists. In the West Indies, a number of BWIR soldiers played important roles in the growth of the working class, union and independence movements. They organized unions, led protests, contributed to reform movements and they laid the groundwork for the move to self-determination and independence. The BWIR served honorably in the Egypt, the Middle East, on the Western Front and in Italy. When given the opportunity, they proved themselves as combat troops. Faced with discrimination and humiliation they fought back against injustice. The BWIR was kept away from the victory parades that marked the end of the war. It was disbanded in 1921. In spite of their efforts, a confidential 1919 Colonial Office memo on the Taranto mutiny makes it clear that the British Government realized that things had changed: Nothing we can do will alter the fact that the black man has begun to think and feel himself as good as the white. Sources: The National Archive (UK) Imperial War Museum No Labour, No Battle: Military Labour During the First World War, Ivor Lee and John Starling Holding aloft the banner of Ethiopia, Winston James Race, Empire and First World War Writing, Santanu Das (editor)
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Heathen Musings. androgyne (zie/zir/zirself pronouns) No bigotry tolerated here. This blog is focused on information regarding Old Norse religion and culture to make it accessible to others. Info on witchcraft and...
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Rationalist Society of Australia Inc.. Australia's oldest freethought group, promoting Reason since 1906. We're in favour of science and evidence, as opposed to superstition and bigotry.
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Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights. The Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights combats bigotry and intolerance.
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dilsency. dils from 🇸🇪Sweden. 25. LGB blog. Homosexuality is not bigotry.
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YouTube. A blog commenting on faith and religion through the eyes of reason. Special emphasis on Islam/Ahmadiyyat from an ex-Ahmadi, ex-Muslim who rejects bigotry.
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CT Voices Of Hope |. Voices of Hope's mission is to foster a culture of courage and social action against hate, bigotry, intolerance and indifference.
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Untitled. A.K.A. - The original “Ms LusciousLips” Australian. Had to have a little sabbatical there, thank you for your patience darlings As always, no racism, prejudice, homophobia, bigotry, ignorance nor...
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this is autistic culture. SUBMISSIONS CURRENTLY CLOSED. This blog is all-inclusive and does not tolerate bigotry. (Please do not submit through the ask box.) Like this content? Become a patron!
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Sara I I I. Mancunian Drummer, Artist and Film maker, specialising in LGBT media. No time for bigotry of any kind.
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Home | Holocaust Museum & Education Center. The Holocaust Museum & Education Center of SWFL's mission is to teach the lessons of the Holocaust to inspire action against bigotry, hatred and violence.
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Dr. Patrick Blessinger | The Future of Higher Education. Creating inclusive curricula in higher education Patrick Blessinger, Enakshi Sengupta and Mandla Makhanya St John's University, USA, The HETL Association, USA and The University of South Africa The ongoing development, growth and stability of modern economic and democratic systems require that people engage in continual education and training throughout the course of their lives – that is, lifelong and lifewide learning. As a result of this contemporary reality, higher education systems around the world, including both formal and non-formal types of learning, have experienced unprecedented change in the past few decades in the areas of democratisation, internationalisation and treating lifelong learning as a human right. These changes have been driven by underlying factors such as social movements, economic forces, legal reforms, technological innovation and changing student needs and demographics. The changes have brought with them a renewed focus on inclusion and equity as paramount issues in the shifting paradigm of higher education. The increased attention to equity and inclusion have, in turn, led to new efforts to improve retention rates, graduation rates and the overall quality of education and student academic achievement. To these ends, humanising higher education and improving social justice conditions have been central to creating a culture of inclusion. Sources of exclusivist attitudes If humanistic attitudes and ethical values are paramount in achieving a culture of inclusion, then it is beneficial also to look at those sources of exclusivist attitudes that run counter to inclusion, such as racism, sexism, elitism, supremacism, hegemony, bigotry and other harmful mindsets that contribute to oppression, intolerance and hate towards others. Some aspects of these mindsets may be reflected through the three types of higher education curriculum: included (what is taught), excluded (what is not taught) and hidden (covert). Each different type of curriculum has an impact on institutional cultures and educational outcomes. Traditionally, most focus tends to be placed on the official included curricula as this explicitly represents the knowledge and skills that students are expected to learn. However, in recent decades, greater attention has been paid to update and modernise the curriculum not only to make it more inclusive of the latest disciplinary knowledge and skills but also to make it more reflective of humanistic values, such as the ethical use of knowledge as well as how to use that knowledge in the service of humanity (for example, integrating multi-culturalism, human rights and sustainable development into the curriculum). The hidden curriculum refers to those implicit lessons learned informally and even unconsciously through everyday social interactions and through the interaction with the wider institutional culture, such as the institution's traditions, rituals, creeds and norms. This hidden curriculum may also influences one's attitudes and mindset on race, ethnicity, sex, gender, social class and other factors. An inclusive hidden curriculum promotes positive attitudes and acceptance of all groups and individuals whereas a non-inclusive hidden curriculum may unwittingly promote negative stereotypes and prejudice of others based on race, ethnicity, sex, gender, social class and other factors. The hidden curriculum, for instance, may be reflected in how faculty and university leaders interact with students, the types of services and extra-curricular activities that are offered (or not offered) to students to promote their well-being and whether the institution's culture is welcoming, positive and reflective of the make-up of the student body. Learning is a social process Learning is not just a cognitive process but also a social process which implies social interactions and learning of social norms. Everything about the culture and the operation of a university sends implied messages to those who live and work there every day. Therefore, important questions to ask include: do the policies, practices and culture of the university create a sense of belonging and well-being? Are curricular and extracurricular activities designed in such a way to foster collaboration and positive interactions? Diversity is a necessary component of inclusion, but not a sufficient one. Are individual perspectives and group identities embraced and encouraged to grow? Having a diverse student body does not guarantee that students will feel a sense of belonging, respect, care, acceptance and empowerment. Developing inclusive educational curricula may also involve changes to curricula content and delivery, pedagogical strategies, learning activities and spaces, faculty evaluation and student assessment. Inclusive leadership drives needed policy changes and ultimately aims to create a culture where everyone is able to participate fully. Platitudes and slogans are insufficient; ultimately inclusion must be operationalised to be successful, which may require a total review and evaluation of the current state of the institution to better understand what changes are needed. Since academic disciplines vary in terms of their content, pedagogical approach, learning activities, worldview etc, it follows that inclusion must also be contextualised and operationalised across different disciplines and programmes. For instance, designing a curriculum that is inclusive requires a mindfulness of student backgrounds and personal and social needs. Including all stakeholders This entails first developing an institution-wide effort that engages everyone (students, faculty, staff and leadership) in the process and seeks their input, which often involves surveys, review of the current research, relevant case studies, action planning committees and open institution-wide discussion forums (for example, conferences, symposiums, cross-functional teams, workshops and faculty learning communities). With this type of inclusive planning the initiative is less likely to be viewed as a purely top-down mandate, but rather as an initiative that is transparent and inclusive. This approach has the added benefit of gaining institution-wide support and trust. Implementing a vision of inclusion and equity entails developing policies and programmes consistent with that vision, and developing a long-term strategic plan that involves needed goals, objectives and evaluation programmes that measure the effectiveness of the plan. Besides the moral imperative of creating a more inclusive curriculum, benefits also include increasing student engagement, retention and graduation rates, as well as overall satisfaction and well-being. Patrick Blessinger is an adjunct associate professor of education at St John's University, New York City, United States, and chief research scientist for the International Higher Education Teaching and Learning Association or HETL. Enakshi Sengupta is director of the Center for Advanced Research in Education at HETL. Mandla Makhanya is principal, vice-chancellor and professor at the University of South Africa. The International HETL Association explores the issues raised in this article in its series on equity and inclusion in higher education. Suggested Citation: Blessinger, P., Sengupta, E., and Makhanya, m. (2019). Creating inclusive curricula in higher education, University World News, Or Blessinger, P., Sengupta, E., and Makhanya, M. (2019). Creating inclusive curricula in higher education, Higher Education Tomorrow, Volume 6, Article 2, Copyright © [2019] Patrick Blessinger, Enakshi Sengupta, and Mandla Makhanya Disclaimer Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author, and as such do not necessarily represent the position(s) of other professionals or any institution.
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Aro, ace, and a-spec people are LGBT.. Rewriting anti-a-spec bigotry, one post at a time. All original posts are made in direct response to posts in the "#Ace Discourse" tag. If one doesn't make sense to you, that's because you didn't see...
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i''m a bitter optimist. who am i; dalia / f / 🌞:♏ / 26 / xicana / usa / 🏳️‍🌈 / inclusive feminist + fandoms; mcu / random + no bigotry 🧿 + 18+ 🔞
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Main Blog : @Neko-ritsu. I don’t support any form of Map(pedophilia)/ddlg/Incest/Abuse/Bigotry/racism/Hate/Ableism/gatekeepers/exclusionism/anti MOGAI/terf/truscum/etc. supporters on my blog! So don’t interact.
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THE BEST TRAVEL PHOTOS. "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness" ~Mark Twain ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DISCLAIMER: THESE...
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Chronicles of The Punk Prophet. Tobias. 25 years old, live just outside of london, punk. This blog consists of pictures and text posts about my life, music, and all things punk. Anti-racism/homophobia/sexism/transphobia/bigotry of...
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Not In Our Town Bloomington-NormalNot In Our Town Bloomington-Normal. Not In Our Town Bloomington-Normal addresses bigotry and bullying in the Twin Cities
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Vanguard News Network Forum. This is an Uncensored forum for Whites. www.vnnforum.com
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Boogie Man: The Lee Atwater Story. "One of the greatest political films ever made." - Washington Post
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The Racial Slur Database. Racial slurs for the whole family, impress your friends with your vast knowledge of hate!
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Islamophobia Today eNewspaper. Chronicling anti-Muslim expression from the webosphere and beyond
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